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E-Glide ST Video Review – Sporty, Feature Rich Electric Bike

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E-Glide ST Video Review - Sporty, Feature Rich Electric Bike

https://electricbikereview.com/e-glide/st/ the E-Glide ST is an affordably priced urban electric bike that’s pavement and packed trail capable, fully outfitted with a rack, integrated LED lights and some fenders… though the fenders are a bit basic. Five levels of pedal assist with three power modes (to optimize torque or efficiency), premium backlit LCD with integrated USB charging port, partially inset battery blends in and keeps weight low and center on the frame for balance. Nice hydraulic disc brakes (180/160 mm rotors) with adjustable reach levers but no motor inhibitors surprisingly, throttle on demand power that overrides all levels of assist for instant power. Shipping costs $175 extra or you can pick it up free in Santa Monica California, semi-vulnerable motor cable at rear, available in three frame sizes, one year comprehensive warranty, nice saddle, pedals and suspension seat post with upgraded saddle and grips.

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Important Accessories for Riding an Electric Bike… Going Further, Faster

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Important Accessories for Riding an Electric Bike… Going Further, Faster

https://electricbikereview.com/guides/10-essential-ebike-accessories/ When you buy a new bicycle, and especially an electric bike, there are some important accessories to consider which will keep you safe and comfortable along the way. For this guide I teamed up with Erik at Peloton Cycles in Fort Collins and basically just asked him to share what he considers to be the most important extras. Some of these, such as the helmet, are essential in my book. Ebike riders tend to go further and faster overall than traditional cyclists. This sort of gear can be fashionable as well as utilitarian and with so many choices, it’s worth visiting your local shop to try them on in person.

– After 5 years of use, the CPSC recommends buying a new helmet, for people who have stored their helmets in extreme heat and cold the foam can get brittle and the foam and plastic starts to break down… Most helmets have a manufacture date to help guide you
– For a proper fit, the helmet should come down to about 1 finger width above your eyebrow and ears (so pretty close to get that coverage)
– In order to keep helmets clean, consider adding a cap that will absorb sweat and may also keep your head warm if it’s a longer cap or tubular scarf type of thing
– Many new helmets have adjustable ratchet systems and you should tighten it enough so that the helmet does not fall off if you bend completely forward, the chin strap should be tight but still allow you to do a full “yawn” motion with your mouth
– Bottle cages are the next accessory you’ll want to consider, this allows you to bring along a water bottle for proper hydration… since not all electric bikes have bottle cages bosses consider a saddle rail mount or other tube-clamp adapter (the two bottle sizes include 21 oz and 24 oz which fit different frame sizes)
– An alternative to water bottles are hydration packs, this will also allow you to store tools, a phone, keys and other things
– Air is also important, learning how to change a flat but also being proactive with thicker tire tubes, kevlar lined tires, using sealents and even some liners can help reduce punctures, from here there are mini-pumps and CO2 cartridges which can be taken along on rides
– Specialized makes a whole line of tools that can be useful if you do get a flat, if your chain breaks or if there is some other loosening or malfunction while out on the ride, a multi-tool is definitely a good accessory and most have a range of hex wrenches
– It’s usually a great idea to bring a mobile phone along on rides in case you need help but there are times when you might not get reception (especially when mountain biking), keep this in mind and note that ebikes often take you further than you’d go on a traditional pedal power bicycle
– First aid, mirrors for signaling, starting a fire and having a space blanket for staying warm can also be very important, if you end up having to spend the night these things could save your life
– Padded bike shorts or pants are also important because they offer some cushion and can wick sweat away, this pairs nicely with suspension seat posts and a comfortable saddle

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Specialized Turbo Levo Locking Tips to Protect the Battery

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Specialized Turbo Levo Locking Tips to Protect the Battery

The Specialized Turbo Levo series has a downtube integrated battery pack which doesn’t physically lock to the frame. Instead of a locking core, they opted for a standard 15 mm thru-axle FSR pivot bolt. While this approach is sturdy and perhaps easier to get at, it’s a bit less secure if you’re locking the bike up in a public space. I was initially very concerned that the battery could get stolen by anyone with a set of hex allen keys but Erik from Peloton Cycles in Fort Collins Colorado showed me how he locks the bike properly so that this won’t happen so easily. In short, he loops a cable through the rear wheel, would disconnect the front wheel using quick release and thread the cable through that as well and ultimately connect it to a u-lock which would also surround the downtube. In this way, the u-lock completely surrounds the battery making it impossible to tip out even if the thru-axle was removed. The cable protects both wheels and the entire bike is secured. We tested this on the Turbo Levo FSR 6Fatty electric mountain bike model and it worked great. Erik recommended the Blackburn u-lock because it secures on both sides (it has notches on both sides) and is therefore more time consuming to cut and steal. Note that Blackburn makes their two point Local U-Lock product in a long size which would work better for ebikes with fat downtubes like the Turbo Levo, you could secure the frame to thicker rails and post with this lock choice. Erik recommends bringing expensive bikes like this inside, not leaving them stored and locked outside overnight because the cable can still be cut and then the battery and wheelset is vulnerable even if the frame itself cannot be stolen so easily.

– Specialized Turbo Levo FSR Comp 6Fatty Ebike: https://electricbikereview.com/specialized/turbo-levo-fsr-comp-6fattie/
– Blackburn Two Point U-Lock Standard: http://amzn.to/2kdynVN
– Blackburn Two Point U-Lock Long Length: http://amzn.to/2kE7XcT
– Blackburn Joliet Kevlar Cable Lock for Rear Wheel: http://amzn.to/2kE9NKK

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